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REGIMENTAL STORE
A Company A Company

Revolutionary War Service 1775-1776

As Commander-In-Chief, George Washington took charge of the main army, which was penning the British into Boston. Philip Schuyler accepted responsibility for the smaller force that was created to defend New York but which was then employed in a preemptive invasion of Canada.

The first Continental officers were drawn from the leaders of their communities. They were products of the militia system, chosen for their experience, ability to raise men, and especially for their political reliability. These leaders mirrored the socio-political elites of their respective colonies. American society in the eighteenth century was "deferential." Leadership in every sphere of life was entrusted to men of merit and wealth on the grounds that they had the greatest stake in society. In return the leaders were obligated to serve society to the best of their abilities.

Alexander McDougall commanded the 1st New York Regiment, which was raised in New York City. He was a leader in the City of the Sons of Liberty. A substantial proportion of his officers had served in the French and Indian War or the city's elite volunteer militia battalion. Schuyler was given blank commissions from Congress to distribute to his regimental officers and following congressional instructions, he launched an invasion of Canada on 31 August 1775.

 Henderson, Party Politics, pp. 53-54; White, "Standing Armies," pp. 95-97, 109-10, 112, 119; Cress, "The Standing Army, the Militia, and the New Republic," pp. 114-38.

 

"A" Company 1st Battalion 69th Infantry (Mech) is a direct descendent of the 8th Company, 1st New York Infantry Regiment of the Continental Army CMH Unit Worksheet, Lineage and Honors, 69th

The company was commanded by Captain Jonathan Quackenboss (also Johannes Quackenbos), who was born on March 7, 1742 in Albany, New York.  On November 10, 1763 he married Catharina (Cathrine) DeWitt, daughter of John and Nancy DeWitt and niece of Govoner George Clinton. Province of New York - Marriage Licenses, Names of persons for whom Marriage Licenses were issued by the Secretary of the Province of New York previous to 1784.  http://longislandgenealogy.com/NYSMarrLic/NYmarlicense.htm

 

 "Congress being informed that Johannes Quackenbos is a proper person and very anxious to be in the service, ordered that the name of Johannes Quackenbos be inserted in the room in stead of Andrew Stockholm (as Captain)". Fernow, New York in the Revolution, Vol 1., pg. 12.

 

Captain Jonathan Quackenboss lived in N.Y. City, where he built a house and stable on the corner of Greenwich and Beech streets.  He died November 17, 1824 his wife died 5-25-1825. Captain Quackenboss commanded the 8th Company of the 1st New York Regiment Infantry Continental Army until January 1776 Historical Register of Officers in the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution, April 1775 to December 1783, Francis B. Hettman, 1914  The 8th Company was disbanded on 15 April 1776 in Quebec. CMH Unit Worksheet

 

Other officers who served in the 8th Company of the 1st New York Regiment Infantry Continental Army were 1st during that time were Lieutenant Jonathan Pearcy (also Pearse, Pearsee) and 2d Lieutenant Gerrit Van Wagenen (also Garret, VanWagener) CMH Unit Worksheet

 

In January 1776, Congress considered the non-Canadian portion of the old New York Department. On the 19th of January, 1776 New York was again authorized to raise four regiments to defend itself. The colony's Provincial Congress allocated company quotas to the various counties on 15 February and submitted nominations for field officers to the Continental Congress in March. Three of the regiments were assembled from 1775 veterans. Alexander McDougall's 1st New York Regiment continued to be principally a New York City unit. The 1st assembled at New York, the 4th at Albany, and the 2d and 3d in the Hudson Highlands. Schuyler retained the 4th in northern New York, while the 2d assumed garrison responsibilities in the Highlands, and the 1st and 3d served at New York City. JCC, 4:69, 190, 238; Smith, Letters of Delegates, 3:80, 100-102, 116-17, 121-24, 300-301, 346-47, 355-56, 381-83, 459; Fitzpatrick, Writings, 5:7-11; Sullivan and Flick, Minutes of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, 1:343-48; Force, American Archives, 4th ser., 4:1081-82; 5:251-53, 267-80, 301, 314-18, 946-47, 968, 1439-40, 1467-69, 1498-99; Historical Magazine, 1st ser., Supplement 4 (1866), pp. 110-11.

Schuyler only gradually released the New York cadres remaining in Canada. The 1st assembled at New York with 3d served at New York City.45

JCC, 4:69, 190, 238; Smith, Letters of Delegates, 3:80, 100-102, 116-17, 121-24, 300-301, 346-47, 355-56, 381-83, 459; Fitzpatrick, Writings, 5:7-11; Sullivan and Flick, Minutes of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, 1:343-48; Force, American Archives, 4th ser., 4:1081-82; 5:251-53, 267-80, 301, 314-18, 946-47, 968, 1439-40, 1467-69, 1498-99; Historical Magazine, 1st ser., Supplement 4 (1866), pp. 110-11.

 

Although both Lieutenants Jonathan Pearcy and lieutenant VanWagenen were listed as officers serving in Canada in a letter from Major General Schyler on 27 February 1776, Heitman, Francis, B.,Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution, April 1775 to December 1783, 1914,pgs.77,212, 527 .

New York in the Revolution As Colony and State, Volume One, Office of the State Comptroller, 1904, p.17

"A" Company is not given any further lineage for their service since the company was disbanded in January 1776.

 

Records indicate Lieutenant Jonathan Pearcy served in the 1st  New York Regiment Infantry Continental Army from 28 June 1775 until January 1776. He served in other regiments during the war including DuBois New York Regiment (26 June 1776) and the 4th New York Regiment Infantry (as Captain, 21 November 1776), the New York Levies (23 April 1778), and Willets Bounty Regiment in January 1784. B.,Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution, April 1775 to December 1783, 1914,pgs.77,212, 527

 

Lieutenant Jonathan Pearcy was born in New York in 1749. He was married twice (Hannah and Mary) and died on October 14, 1805 in New York. Daughters of the American Revolution, Patriot Index

 

On the other hand, 2d Lieutenant Gerrit VanWagenen served in the 8th Company, 1st New York Regiment Infantry Continental Army from 28 June 1775. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on 26 June 1776 but was captured on 27 August 1776 during the Battle of Long Island. Heitman, Francis, B.,Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution, April 1775 to December 1783, 1914 .

 

Lieutenant VanWagenen remained in the Continental Army and was captured during the Battle of Long Island. Lieutenant VanWagenen was exchanged in June 1778 and subsequently served as Deputy Commissary, Prisoners. Heitman, Francis, B.,Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution, April 1775 to December 1783, 1914 . Military records indicate that "A" Company then traces its lineage to Captain Gerrit VanWagenen's Company, a unit in Aaron Burr's New York Regiment (3d Regiment of Infantry New York Militia) (4 October 1786) Council of Appointments, History of the Ninth Regiment.  Gerrit VanWagenen was born on 21 January 1753 in New York. He was married to Sarah Brinckerhoff and he died on 20 November 1835. Daughters of the American Revolution, Patriot Index

 

On 8 March 1800, this unit was redesignated as the 6th Company of the 6th Regiment of Infantry. Appointments Book CMH Unit Worksheet

(The 9th Regiment, which was nicknamed "The City Guard," had its origins in several independent companies raised in 1786. The 9th traces its history to 24 Jun 1799, when 16 companies ordered merged as 6th Infantry).  

27 Mar 1805, Reorganized as the 2nd Artillery Appointments Book GO, Gov NY 27 March 1805, 19 May 1806, history of the 9th Regiment CMH Unit Worksheet

13 Jun 1812 ,  Redesignated the 9th Regiment of Artillery GO, AGO NY 13 Jun 1812

17 December 1813 as the 9th Battalion of Artillery GO, AGO NY 17 Dec 1813 CMH Unit Worksheet

 Although during the war of 1812, the 9th helped man the New York harbor forts and for a time maintained a detached battery at Sag Harbor, near the eastern end of Long Island, "A" Company is not

awarded honors for serving in the War of 1812. The 9th Regiment was consolidated into the 69th in 1858 but not the entire regiment. In 1859, the New York Militia was reorganized and two 9th Regiments were formed for a short period of time. The old 9th Regiment's lineage and honors were awarded to the 244th Coast Artillery not the 69th Regiment. The New York State Militia Law of 1847 had reduced the number of regiments from about 300 to 71, mostly through mergers or redesignation.

 

On 27 July 1847, the unit was redesignated the 9th Regiment New York State Militia GO, AGO NY 27 Jul 1847, Appointments Book  It was then designated on the 22 of January 1858 as Company B, 9th Regiment GO 3 AGO NY 22 Jan 1858 CMH Unit Worksheet

 

The militia was not created by the common law. Militia law is statutory law. The charter of each American colony included authority to create militia units. All American colonies passed militia laws under the authority granted by their charters. All states and the federal government have militia laws. All white able-bodied free males were required by law to belong to the militia by the statute law of the colony.  Sometime the militia laws were strictly enforced, sometime laxly. The requirement for service could be met by joining either the colony's militia in your local area or joining (if they would have you) a volunteer militia unit. A distinction is drawn between those who did their militia duty in the compulsory units and those who did their militia duty in volunteer units. The compulsory militia was known as trainbands, beat militia, or enrolled militia. The volunteer militia was known as the volunteer militia, or the uniform militia. The term 'uniform' referred to the fact that the volunteers wore uniforms.

The 69th Regiment existed in New York prior to its official recognition. On October 18, 1837, Sylvester Brisack was commissioned as a Captain, in the 69th Regiment, Infantry. He was appointed by William L. Marcy, Governor of New York State and signed by the Adjutant General in Albany on December 25, 1827. However the 69th Regiment was officially organized on December 21, 1849.  

The New York State Militia Law of 1847 reduced the number of regiments from about 300 to 71, mostly through mergers or re-designation of the largest, most effective, and most enthusiastic of the existing units.  Regiments were given territorial bases, with those in New York and other large cities assigned specific wards as their recruiting districts. 

Eight divisions were formed, each comprising four brigades of two to six regiments.  The numbering of regiments, brigades, and divisions began with those in New York City: thus the 1st Division's (The division included fourteen regiments. The 1st through the 12th comprised the four regular brigades, with the 69th Infantry and the 71st, a rifle regiment, as well as an independent battalion from Staten Island, attached.) 1st Brigade was comprised the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Regiments. 




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